New WordPress 5.0 – How and When to Update

WordPress 5.0 is being released tomorrow, December 6th. This release contains a major change to the WordPress editor. The new editor, code-named Gutenberg, is a substantial leap forward in functionality. It uses a new block-based system for editing which allows you to embed a wide range of content in your posts and pages, and gives you a lot of flexibility in laying out those blocks on the page.
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Internet Solutions HK becomes CloudFlare partner

This is a guest post written and contributed by CloudFlare.

CloudFlare, a web performance and security company, is excited to announce our partnership with Internet Solutions HK! If you haven’t heard about CloudFlare before, our value proposition is simple: we’ll make any website twice as fast and protect it from a broad range of web threats.

We power more than 400 billion monthly page views – more than Amazon, Wikipedia, Twitter, Zynga, AOL, Apple, Bing, eBay, PayPal and Instagram combined – and over 1.2 billion monthly users regularly pass through our network. We’re really glad Internet Solutions HK has partnered with CloudFlare – said Michael Nelson from CloudFlare.

Faster web performance
CloudFlare is designed to take a great hosting platform like Internet Solutions HK and make it even better.

We run 69 data centers strategically located around the world. When you sign up for CloudFlare, we begin routing your traffic to the nearest data center.

As your traffic passes through the data centers, we intelligently determine what parts of your website are static versus dynamic. The static portions are cached on our servers for a short period of time, typically less than 2 hours before we check to see if they’ve been updated. By automatically moving the static parts of your site closer to your visitors, the overall performance of your site improves significantly.

CloudFlare’s intelligent caching system also means you save bandwidth, which means saving money, and decreases the load on your servers, which means your web application will run faster and more efficiently than ever. On average, CloudFlare customers see a 60% decrease in bandwidth usage, and a 65% in total requests to their servers. The overall effect is that CloudFlare will typically cut the load time for pages on your site by 50% which means higher engagement and happier visitors.

Broad web security
Over the course of 2011, CloudFlare identified a 700% increase in the number of distributed denial of service attacks (DDoS) we track on the Internet (see the chart below). As attacks like these increase, CloudFlare is stepping up to protect sites.

CloudFlare’s security protections offer a broad range of protections against attacks such as DDoS, hacking or spam submitted to a blog or comment form. What is powerful about our approach is that the system gets smarter the more sites that are part of the CloudFlare community. We analyze the traffic patterns of hundreds of millions of visitors in real time and adapt the security systems to ensure good traffic gets through and bad traffic is stopped.

In time, our goal is nothing short of making attacks against websites a relic of history. And, given our scale and the billions of different attacks we see and adapt to every year, we’re well on our way to achieving that for sites on the CloudFlare network.

Signing up
Any website can deploy CloudFlare, regardless of your underlying platform. By integrating closely with Internet Solutions HK, we make the process of setting up CloudFlare “1 click easy” through your existing Internet Solutions HK [control panel] dashboard. Just look for the CloudFlare icon, choose the domain you want to enable, and click the orange cloud. That’s it!

We’ve kept the price as low as possible and plans offered through Internet Solutions HK are free. Moreover, we never charge you for bandwidth or storage, therefore saving you tons via reduced bandwidth costs.

For site owners who would like to take advantage of CloudFlare’s advanced offerings, we also offer a ‘Pro’ tier of service for $20/month . The ‘Pro’ tier includes all of the ‘Free’ tier’s offerings, as well as extra features like SSL, full web application firewall and faster analytics.

We’re proud that every day more than a thousand new sites, including some of the largest on the web, join the CloudFlare community. If you’re looking for a faster, safer website, you’ve got a good start with Internet Solutions HK, but the next step is to join the CloudFlare community.

Business Email Service Is Over, New Enterprise Email Is On

Since February we have been announcing the end of the “BUSINESS” email to introduce the new, more powerful and reliable “ENTERPRISE” email service. However, the improvements generate new costs that we need to pass to our users. But have you compared our email service to others like Google Apps for Business, Sina.com.cn or Tencent (qq.com) Enterprise email service? We are on average 50% cheaper than them! And we offer the same Enterprise grade service!

BUT WHAT IF I FEEL IS TOO EXPENSIVE?

freakout

Sure no problem, you have the following options:
1. Start using the *FREE cPanel email service (contact us to update the DNS settings) remember that we do not offer technical support or any guarantee.
2. Use another email service provider like Google Apps, Sina, Tencent.
3. Delete accounts that you are not using so you only pay for the ones really important.

We are sorry for any inconvenience caused! Remember that this change was made to improve the email experience quality.

Any question please write to us: support(a)internetsolutions.hk

* Available only for Web Hosting clients.

Godaddy Also Experienced DDOS Attack

On its system alert page, GoDaddy apologized for the “brief delay in service.”

“We are fixing an issue impacting one or more services,” GoDaddy said.

On Sunday (April 12th), GoDaddy’s security team identified a spike in traffic that “could be malicious in nature.” The company claimed to have resolved the issue, however it seems that Monday’s outage may be related. An update around 4:25 pm ET, which replaced the message about the “brief delay in service”, said that GoDaddy’s security team has identified another spike in traffic that could be “malicious in nature.”

The timing is less than ideal for GoDaddy, who made its debut on the NYSE less than two weeks ago. On Monday GDDY stock was at $25.30, up 0.04 percent from its previous close.

More info: http://www.thewhir.com/web-hosting-news/godaddy-users-report-site-outages-company-investigates-potential-ddos-attack

Why Hong Kong Will Be China’s New Tech Hub

By: Paul Denlinger

More than 10 years ago, before the Internet bubble popped in 2000, Silicon Valley venture capitalists and technology professionals all looked to China as the goal of any leading Internet company. So big was the attraction of China that all of the leading companies to go public went out of their way to associate themselves with the China market. In 1999, the first China-play company to go public on NASDAQ, Chinadotcom (now CDC) went so far as to obtain the ticker symbol CHINA.

Companies based in Hong Kong went out of their way to associate themselves with Beijing and Shanghai, the two leading cities in China. Microsoft, Yahoo and later Google all sought to recruit engineering graduates from Tsinghua University in Beijing, China’s leading university for aspiring scientists (and political leaders), offering the best candidates competitive signing packages. Shanghai became home to China’s leading online gaming firms, lead by Shanda Online Entertainment, which went public in 2004 on NASDAQ and which now has a market cap of US$3 billion.

Compared to Beijing, Hong Kong did not have a high degree of technology talent. It did not have a Tsinghua University. It did not have the growth of the Shanghai region with its population of 100 million. The leading venture capital funds completely bypassed Hong Kong. Even its own best online technology and marketing talent left for Beijing and Shanghai, secure in the knowledge that they would be able to make more in VC-funded companies in mainland China instead of Hong Kong. Attempting to stem the talent flow, and to make Hong Kong more tech-friendly, the Hong Kong government spent millions to develop Cyberport, an ultra-modern tech campus with state of the art infrastructure and its own start-up incubator program. But for many years, the buildings were half empty.

Now though, the tide has turned. Cyberport is almost completely full, and there is a certain confidence in the air of being called a Hong Kong technology professional. What happened?

Broadly speaking, circumstances changed in the technology, business and political fields:

The hot area in software development is now mobile apps for the iPhone and Android platforms, both of which have very high penetration in Hong Kong. Hong Kongers are, for the most part, early adopters of new mobile technology. And mobile apps don’t need large, expensive development teams; most are developed by small teams of 2-3 persons using free development kits from Apple and Google.

The Web 3.0 emphasis on mobile means that even though wages and costs are higher than in mainland China, they are affordable. Break-even points are much lower than 10 years ago, and many smaller firms don’t even need venture capital financing; they can cover their costs based solely on mobile app sales. A small company can sell its apps to the world through the Apple and Google application stores, and collect payment without restriction. One local success story is Stepcase, maker of the popular Darkroom and Actioncam photo applications for the iPhone.

Hong Kong’s high population density makes universal wireless and broadband a reality, making U.S. broadband seem embarrassingly slow in comparison. 1000 MPS service is now advertised to homes.
Setting up a business in Hong Kong is much simpler and more straightforward than in mainland China. A new company can be registered and bank accounts opened in two days, compared to 30-60 days in China. Except for the Chinese yuan, which is non-convertible, payment can be received in any currency.
Another growth area for Hong Kong developers are Facebook gaming and Facebook apps. Facebook is very popular in Hong Kong. It is blocked in mainland China.

Unlike in mainland China, websites are not censored by the Chinese government’s Golden Shield, referred to by critics as the Great Firewall of China, or #gfw. Twitter and Facebook are freely accessible in Hong Kong, without the need for proxy servers as they are in mainland China.

In mainland China, the only three mobile operators are China Mobile, China Unicom and China Telecom. They all report directly to China’s State Council, China’s cabinet, and win their approval for major business decisions. This applies even to the introduction of new mobile services, making them political, not business decisions. In contrast, Hong Kong mobile operators are unregulated about when they can introduce new services for consumers. While mainland Chinese operators are held back waiting for political decisions, Hong Kong operators just charge ahead in the competition for consumers.
Because there is no Internet censorship, the services which are popular in the west are also popular in Hong Kong, such as Yahoo!, Facebook, Twitter and Google. Out of deference to Beijing, this is not widely publicized, though it is well-known among Hong Kong locals and industry insiders.

Over the past year, the Beijing government has implemented a tough policy of holding web publishers accountable for all content, including advertising and comments. Out of fear of losing their licenses, editors have clamped down hard on content. This has had a dampening effect on Internet development in mainland China.
For western companies in China, doing business is very hard. Most recently, Google shut down its Chinese search engine and redirected all China search traffic to… Hong Kong. Earlier casualties included Yahoo! and eBay. Again, deference to Beijing keeps Hong Kong investment officials from talking too loudly about this issue.
Since Hong Kong is the fourth largest capital market in the world, some of China’s leading Internet giants, including Tencent and Alibaba have chosen to list in Hong Kong instead of in New York.

Does this mean that Hong Kong is completely safe now as a technology center for Asia and for China? No. If for instance, China chose to completely lift content restrictions and chose to treat foreign companies completely the same as Chinese companies, and completely deregulate its mobile industry, Hong Kong would lose its advantage.

But that is not likely to happen soon. So for those smart enough to look harder, they can find very interesting options in Hong Kong, China.

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